Battle of Marston Moor brought to life

IT WAS a definitive battle in one of England’s most bloody wars, seeing more than 4,000 deaths and changing the course of history.

Monday, 12th July 2021, 4:26 pm
3rd July 2021
Equistry and The Troop bring history to life as they commemorate the 377 th
anniversary of the Battle of Marston Moor. At noon, they will be giving a brief historical talk outside
the Boot and Shoe Inn, Tockwith before riding to the battlefield and memorial. This charity ride is
supporting Brooke, an international charity that protects and improves the lives of horses, donkeys
and mules which give people in the developing world the opportunity to work their way out of
poverty.
Pictured the group on the battlefield at Marsden Moor.
Picture Gerard Binks
3rd July 2021 Equistry and The Troop bring history to life as they commemorate the 377 th anniversary of the Battle of Marston Moor. At noon, they will be giving a brief historical talk outside the Boot and Shoe Inn, Tockwith before riding to the battlefield and memorial. This charity ride is supporting Brooke, an international charity that protects and improves the lives of horses, donkeys and mules which give people in the developing world the opportunity to work their way out of poverty. Pictured the group on the battlefield at Marsden Moor. Picture Gerard Binks

And recently, the Battle of Marston Moor, which took place in 1644, was brought back to life in a re-enactment involving historical experts and horses at the site near Tockwith.

The English Civil War fight was recreated for the Battle of Marston Moor Charity Ride to raise funds for Brooke, an international horse and donkey welfare charity.

It took place the day after the 377th anniversary of the battle, which happened during the reign of the ill-fated Charles I.

Equistry and The Troop bring history to life as they commemorate the 377 th anniversary of the Battle of Marston Moor. Pictured the group prepare before the ride to the battlefield at Marsden Moor. Picture Gerard Binks

It saw a decisive victory for Oliver Cromwell’s Roundheads and forced the Royalists to abandon the North of England effectively sealing their fate as the losing faction.

The re-enactment was led by Equistry and The Troop, who specialise in re-tellings of key moments in history that involved cavalry.

The group perform re-enactments of key battles dating from Roman times to the First World War.

A brief talk outlining the history and key moments of the battle was held outside the Boot and Shoe Inn in Tockwith before riders headed to the battlefield site for the re-enactment event.

A pair of mounted sentries, in full Civil War dress, stood guard at the memorial to the battle, an imposing obelisk between Long Marston and Tockwith which was unveiled in 1939.

A spokesman for Equistry said: “The Battle of Marston Moor on was a turning point in the Civil War, as Cromwell’s forces defeated the Royalists and the king’s cause in the North.”