Review: Nissan Navara Trek-1°

Review: Nissan Navara Trek-1°
Review: Nissan Navara Trek-1°

Unique features and top-spec tech for limited-edition Navara

Get ready for a (simple, we promise) geography lesson. On a map, longitude lines are the ones that go up and down. London is on zero degrees. Northern Spain’s Navarre desert is on the 1° mark. The Nissan Navara Trek-1° is named after that geographical fact.

Phew. If, like us, you had a flashback to your old school desk just then, fret not: we’re coming bang up to date now with the most cutting-edge (in terms of spec anyway) version of Nissan’s popular pick-up.

Nissan is making 1,500 of these Trek-1°s, and 400 of them are coming to the UK. There’s every chance they’ll be quickly sold, because despite what you might think about vehicles that were originally designed for grubby work, there’s a clear and busy market for premium pick-ups in Europe. And in this peculiar but profitable market, the Nissan Trek-1° may be the most focused creation yet.

Based on the top-spec Tekna trim level – which accounts for four in every five UK Navara sales – the Trek-1° comes only in double-cab, five-seater form. The add-on to the price is £3,435, but on top of the Tekna luxury you get plenty of one-off features such as loadbed bars with two LED spotlights, black side styling bars, bespoke 18-inch six-spoke alloys, Trek-1° decals, and a hingeing loadbed cover that conceals a network of flexible dividers and liners.

Nissan Navara Trek-1°

Nissan Navara Trek-1° 

Nissan Navara Trek-1°

Price: £36,765
Engine: 2.3-litre, four-cylinder, twin-turbo, diesel
Power: 187bhp
Torque: 332lb/ft
Gearbox: Seven-speed automatic
Kerbweight: 1958kg
0-62mph: 10.8sec
Top speed: 112mph
Fuel economy: 40.1mpg (combined)
CO2 rating: 183g/km

Colours are restricted to Black Metallic or model-exclusive Storm White. Motive power comes from the familiar 2.3-litre turbocharged diesel in unchanged 158bhp or 187bhp formats, with a six-speed manual or a seven-speed automatic gearbox.

The first impression on climbing up into a Navara Trek-1° is that you’re in a well-equipped SUV. The seats are leather and the Qashqai-alike dashboard has a seven-inch touchscreen with DAB radio and sat-nav.

The more powerful 187bhp model with seven-speed automatic ‘box develops a useful 332lb ft of torque from 1,500rpm and wafts along impressively, making light of its 1,991kg weight.

cceleration both from stationary and on the move is strong enough to lend credence to the 3.5-tonne towing claim. The auto is slightly hesitant to kick down, reducing overtaking ability on slower roads, but otherwise it snicks quickly between the gears and boosts the the Trek-1°’s premium feel.

Nissan Navara Trek-1° interior

In fact the whole driveline is well up in the top segment of performers in this market. The four-wheel drive system has three modes. For optimum fuel economy, select two-wheel drive. For best pulling power, pick four-wheel drive. For max off-road traction, there’s four-wheel drive low. It’s all on offer at the flick of a switch and will reassure anyone worried about the gentrification of the Navara that, beneath all the glitz, the basic systems still work well. As does the Navara’s five-link rear suspension, giving a good ride on the 18-inch wheels and smothering speed humps with aplomb, even if less prominent surface glitches will send shudders through the body.

Overall, the SUV-like driving experience is positive testimony to the Navara’s gradual development. This vehicle is 331mm longer than a Range Rover, but doesn’t feel it. Visibility is predictably good from that height and improved by parking sensors and a 360-degree monitor that automatically switches to rear view when you go into reverse.

Nissan Navara Trek-1°

If you’re not so bothered about exclusivity or a smattering of bespoke (mainly styling) features, the regular Tekna does the same job as the Trek-1° for £3,435 less. It wouldn’t be quite as cool as the Trek-1°, but it would be better value and a lot cheaper than premium pick-up alternatives like the Amarok. If you do plump for a Trek-1°, mind your LED spotlights in multi-storey car parks.

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