Foos crash and. nearly burn at Leeds Festival

**FILE**Dave Grohl, second from right, and the Foo Fighters -- Nate Mendel, left, Taylor Hawkins, Dave Grohl and Chris Shiflett, right, are photographed before their concert  in Duluth, Ga., Sept. 8, 2005.   Grohl told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio Thursday, Aug. 31, 2006, that he plans to make good on an offer to buy beers for two miners who listened to his band during their ordeal of being buried underground for two weeks. Grohl said he will catch up with the two men when the band tours Australia in October.(AP Photo/John Amis)

**FILE**Dave Grohl, second from right, and the Foo Fighters -- Nate Mendel, left, Taylor Hawkins, Dave Grohl and Chris Shiflett, right, are photographed before their concert in Duluth, Ga., Sept. 8, 2005. Grohl told Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio Thursday, Aug. 31, 2006, that he plans to make good on an offer to buy beers for two miners who listened to his band during their ordeal of being buried underground for two weeks. Grohl said he will catch up with the two men when the band tours Australia in October.(AP Photo/John Amis)

0
Have your say

Review by Gig Scene Editor Graham Chalmers

Leeds Festival (Friday)

Bizarrely, All Time Low, the tame, would-be deliquents are almost preferable to today’s big headliners on the main stage, the Foo Fighters.

I’ve seen the god-like Dave Grohl and his amazing band three times before and always loved them even though, like most classic rock bands, they’ve produced a lot of average album tracks amid the gems over the years.

Perhaps they’ve simply got too good and been too successful for too long or maybe it’s the curse of the main stage but tonight they fly too close to the sun and get burnt.

People around me whoop for the first five songs or so in an epic two and a half hour set, even when Grohl messes around something rotten with the stone cold classic All My Life.

Then the whopping stops from everyone beyond the halfway mark hill.

Songs are being stretched out by an extra two to three minutes at a time as Grohl stops and starts to make a point or add a solo or interpose a change of direction.

For a band famous for their ferocious energy, the Foo Fighters are behaving suspiciously like a jazz band.

The trouble is they’re not playing jazz music, they’re playing three or four chord rock songs which don’t suit this approach.

The punchy Monkey Wrench goes on for what feels like ten terrible minutes.

Led Zeppelin tried this sort of behavior back in the 1970s until punk ran the legendary rock band out of town.

Zeppelin had about ten to 15 styles of songs in their back catalogue but the Foos only have three and what they are doing on stage tonight is more of a lap of honour than a gig, though I’m sure edited down to an hour on TV you’d probably still lap it up happily with a cold beer.

Nope, as much as I admire and respect Mr Grohl, perhaps it’s time for a younger generation to step up to the plate.

For full review, see this Thursday’s Harrogate Advertiser Series