Council rejects tax revolt threat

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Homeowners’ threats to stop paying their council tax over the state of their street’s potholes have fallen on deaf ears, as the council dismissed their road as “low priority”.

Cedar Close residents said they were being treated like “second-class” citizens and did not know why they were paying their council tax because of the “enormous” potholes littering their street.

The street is classed as 'low priority' by the highways department.

The street is classed as 'low priority' by the highways department.

David Parkin, 69, who has lived on Cedar Close for 40 years, told attendants at a North Yorkshire County Council (NYCC) area committee meeting on Thursday, June 6 that he has been asking the council to do something about the roads for two years.

“They come and mark the roads but I think that is just a smokescreen to make us think work will be done,” Mr Parkin, a former heavy goods driver, told attendants at the meeting.

As the Gazette reported last week, Mr Parkin and his neighbours – including Mike Contek, 28, who has had two tyres damaged by the potholes in the past two months – have threatened to stop paying their council tax over the issue.

But James Malcolm, NYCC’s highways area manager, told Mr Parkin at Thursday’s meeting: “Ceder Close is a low category road with minor defects. Most of our funding is used for essential repairs.”

Harrogate borough Coun Michael Harrison and chairman of the area committee added: “I wouldn’t recommend residents stop paying their council tax.”

But Mr Parkin is more defiant than ever to ensure residents’ pothole grievances are heard. “I’ll give them a couple of months and see what happens, and if nothing happens, I’ll stop paying,” he said.