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Viking hoard to remain in Yorkshire

Natalie McCaul curator of archaeology at York Museums with a silver Viking neck ring which is part of the recently discovered Bedale Hoard which will be on display at the Yorkshire Musem in York. (GL1001/69h)

Natalie McCaul curator of archaeology at York Museums with a silver Viking neck ring which is part of the recently discovered Bedale Hoard which will be on display at the Yorkshire Musem in York. (GL1001/69h)

It gives a fascinating glimpse into the riches which were accrued during the Viking era.

And now the life savings of an affluent Norse warrior, which includes styles of jewellery which have never been seen before, will remain in Yorkshire after a major fundraising drive collected more than £50,000.

The Bedale Hoard has been bought by the Yorkshire Museum in York after a public appeal raised £51,636.

The museum’s curator of archaeology, Natalie McCaul, said: “It is fantastic that the public and funders have helped us keep this spectacular hoard.

“We would like to thank them for their generosity. The hoard is an incredible and intriguing find and one that we can now carry out research on to hopefully shed new light on Viking life in this part of Yorkshire.”

The appeal was launched in January and The Art Fund and the Victoria and Albert Purchase Grant Fund both contributed £11,000.

The rest of the funds were raised from other funding bodies and the public. The hoard was found on land near Bedale by metal detectorists in May 2012, and consists of a gold sword pommel, antique silver neck ring and neck collar, a silver armlet, 29 silver ingots, two other silver neck rings, gold rivets and half a silver brooch.

Part of the hoard was found by metal detectorist Stuart Campbell and his metal detecting partner on land in Bedale.

They informed the North Yorkshire finds liaison officer of the Portable Antiquities Scheme, Rebecca Griffiths, based at the Yorkshire Museum and she and a colleague went to the site and unearthed the rest of the hidden treasures.

The large gold sword pommel is believed to be from an Anglo-Saxon sword. This is made from iron and inlaid with plaques of gold foil. These plaques bear Trewhiddle style decoration, named after a hoard found in Trewhiddle, Cornwall, consisting of animals, which was a common style all over England in the ninth century.

The hoard was discovered in a part of Yorkshire of which very little is known about in the Viking period, so the fact it exists sheds new light on the region from 1,000 years ago.

 

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