DCSIMG

Leeds City Council reject plans for 700 houses

Millennium Square and Leeds Civic Hall, Leeds City Centre, where the North East Plans Panel meets to discuss planning applications. Picture: Mark Bickerdike.

Millennium Square and Leeds Civic Hall, Leeds City Centre, where the North East Plans Panel meets to discuss planning applications. Picture: Mark Bickerdike.

The prospect of adding up to 700 houses to the area caused concern for many people, but the plans have now been rejected by Leeds City Council.

The proposal, which would have seen up to 700 houses built on land at East Scholes, plus health care and education facilities, was refused by the city plans panel.

This decision followed an earlier recommendation for refusal from council officers which said the application, submitted by Scholes Development Company Ltd. and Barratt David Wilson Homes in March 2014, was premature, does not satisfy infrastructure policy, and adversely impact on the character and identity of Scholes.

Scholes and Barwick Parish Council chair Ben Hogan welcomed the rejection. He said: “We are very delighted. It was something we expected at this stage, but until it actually is announced you are always wondering if they have something to swing it their way.

“They brought absolutely nothing new to the table - it was virtually the same as their proposal at the last plans panel and on that day they were told they should look elsewhere and they got the same message this time.

“I am pretty certain it will go to appeal. I can’t see any developer spending the kind of money that has been spent already and not continuing until it has gone the full way.

“I still think along with most people in this village that the chances of it going ahead are always going to be there, but at the end of the day the whole plan is not sustainable and we will soon have our neighbourhood development plan to help us defend it.”

According to the decision notice, the application represents too substantial an expansion of Scholes, and as such is contrary to the council’s draft core strategy.

The notice also states that the applicant did not demonstrate that the highway could safely absorb the pressures of increased traffic, and that the proposed development would not meet the required standard of sustainability.

Harewood Coun Rachael Procter (Con) also pleased with the decision. She said: “I am delighted that sanity has prevailed and this application has been turned down. If given the green light this would have had a hugely negative impact on Scholes, virtually doubling the village in size.”

A Barratt David Wilson Homes spokesman said: “We are in the process of reviewing the details of the refusal of the planning application. Following this work and receipt of the core strategy inspectors report we will consider the most suitable course of action with our professional team to take this forward.”

 

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